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Tag: transatlantic trade

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A New Boost to Transatlantic Ties: The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership and the EU-Turkey Customs Union

By: Eray Akdag / The German Marshall Fund Eray Akday is the TUSIAD Permanent Ankara Representative. The below article was published by The German Marshall Fund in their “On Turkey” series. You can find the original here.  During Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s recent visit to the United States, the White House declared that “the United States and Turkey decided today to establish a bilateral High Level Committee led by the Ministry of Economy of Turkey and the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, associated with the Framework for Strategic Economic and Commercial Cooperation, with the ultimate objective of continuing to deepen our economic relations and liberalize trade.”[1]This is obviously an important step, however, it is equally certain that it’s not enough. Quickly, establishing a formal mechanism that would work parallel to Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T-TIP) negotiations is critical. It can also be alleged that, as stated by Kaleağasi and Ornarlı earlier[2] Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership “is of crucial significance for Turkey” and “Turkey can play a significant role in that structure.” 

Statement by TUSIAD President Muharrem Yilmaz

April 17, 2013 TUSIAD President Muharrem Yilmaz made the following statement on the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP): The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) is the most recent chapter in the Transatlantic Economic Partnership (TEP) project, which was launched at the 1998 US – EU Summit in London.  

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Don't forget free trade with Turkey

By: Kemal Kirisci / The National Interest Last month, both the U.S. and the European Union (EU) took important internal steps to prepare the ground work for negotiations to establish the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership. TTIP would create the largest integrated market in the world, bringing together half of the world’s GDP and 30 percent of world trade. If it went beyond eliminating already low-level tariffs and succeeded in aligning regulatory standards on both sides of the Atlantic, it also could generate more than 3 percent GDP growth. Beyond bilateral effects, TTIP could also spill over to global-trading trends and serve as a tool for strengthening the Western economic order. But in its current form TTIP would leave Turkey, currently the sixteenth-largest economy in the world, and a long-standing transatlantic ally, out in the cold.