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Tag: customs union

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A New Boost to Transatlantic Ties: The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership and the EU-Turkey Customs Union

By: Eray Akdag / The German Marshall Fund Eray Akday is the TUSIAD Permanent Ankara Representative. The below article was published by The German Marshall Fund in their “On Turkey” series. You can find the original here.  During Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s recent visit to the United States, the White House declared that “the United States and Turkey decided today to establish a bilateral High Level Committee led by the Ministry of Economy of Turkey and the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, associated with the Framework for Strategic Economic and Commercial Cooperation, with the ultimate objective of continuing to deepen our economic relations and liberalize trade.”[1]This is obviously an important step, however, it is equally certain that it’s not enough. Quickly, establishing a formal mechanism that would work parallel to Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (T-TIP) negotiations is critical. It can also be alleged that, as stated by Kaleağasi and Ornarlı earlier[2] Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership “is of crucial significance for Turkey” and “Turkey can play a significant role in that structure.” 

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Turkey seeks to form working group for U.S. free trade deal

By: Emre Peker / The Wall Street Journal Turkey’s prime minister will seek to form a working group to draft a free-trade agreement with the U.S. during a state visit in May, marking an effort to counter an increasingly onerous customs deal with the European Union, Economy Minister Zafer Caglayan said Tuesday. The push by Recep Tayyip Erdogan comes amid discussions to revise or annul the country’s 1996 customs union with the EU, widely seen as a precursor to Turkey’s entry to the bloc. Turkey’s accession talks finally started in 2005, but have been frozen for almost three years amid political disagreements and the region’s debt crisis.